Generalized System of Preferences

Source:  UNCTAD

Website: http://www.unctad.org

Download date: 05/05/2008

       Programmes   International Trade and Commodities   DITC Programmes   Generalized System of Preferences

 

I- About GSP

As stated in Resolution 21 (ii) taken at the UNCTAD II Conference in New Delhi in 1968,

"… the objectives of the generalized, non-reciprocal, non-discriminatory system of preferences in favour of the developing countries, including special measures in favour of the least advanced among the developing countries, should be:

(a)  to increase their export earnings;
(b)  to promote their industrialization; and
(c)  to accelerate their rates of economic growth."

Under GSP schemes of preference-giving counties, selected products originating in developing countries are granted reduced or zero tariff rates over the MFN rates. The least developed countries (LDCs) receive special and preferential treatment for a wider coverage of products and deeper tariff cuts.

The idea of granting developing countries preferential tariff rates in the markets of industrialized countries was originally presented by Raul Prebisch, the first Secretary-General of UNCTAD, at the first UNCTAD conference in 1964. The GSP was adopted at UNCTAD II in New Delhi in 1968.

In 1971, the GATT Contracting Parties approved a waiver to Article I of the General Agreement for 10 years in order to authorize the GSP scheme. Later, the Contracting Parties decided to adopt the 1979 Enabling Clause, Decision of the Contracting Parties of 28 November 1979 (26S/203) entitled "Differential and more favourable treatment, reciprocity and fuller participation of eveloping countries", creating a permanent waiver to the most-favoured-nation clause to allow preference-giving countries to grant preferential tariff treatment under their respective GSP schemes.

There are currently 13 national GSP schemes notified to the UNCTAD secretariat. The following countries grant GSP preferences: Australia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Estonia, the European Union, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, the Russian Federation, Switzerland, Turkey and the United States of America.

 

II- GSP Newsletters

This UNCTAD GSP Newsletter provides government authorities and exporters in developing countries with information on current developments in the generalized system of preferences (GSP) and related issues. Following a period of re-organization, a few issues of Newsletters are expected each year while special issues will be published when relevant new information becomes available.

 

1- GSP - UNCTAD GSP NEWSLETTER, No. 8 - Dec. 2005, 01/12/05 (UNCTAD/DITC/TNCD/Misc/2005/7), 9 pages, 140KB

2- GSP - UNCTAD GSP NEWSLETTER, No. 7 - Nov. 2005, 01/11/05 (UNCTAD/DITC/TNCD/MISC/2005/6), 4 pages, 57KB

3- GSP - UNCTAD GSP NEWSLETTER, No. 6 - Nov. 2005, 01/11/05 (UNCTAD/DITC/TNCD/MISC/2005/5), 5 pages, 86KB

4- GSP - UNCTAD GSP NEWSLETTER, No. 5 - Feb. 2002, 01/04/02 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.65), 7 pages, 80KB

 

III- GSP - LIST OF BENEFICIARIES

. Highlights
This document contains a list of beneficiaries for each of the GSP schemes currently in operation according to notifications received from the UNCTAD member States. While every care has been made to ensure the accuracy of the list, the UNCTAD secretariat would appreciate being notified of any errors.
The list will be periodically updated to reflect modifications that may be made by preference-giving countries.

The terminology used in the list for the designation of the countries and territories is that of the respective preference-giving countries.

 

. Downloads

 

IV- Handbooks on the GSP schemes
The handbooks present the contents of the 10 GSP schemes in a user-friendly format, emphasizing how Governments and firms in beneficiary countries can make the best use of each scheme.

Users of a particular handbook are encouraged to do the following:

While every care has been taken to ensure that the information contained on this site is correct, no claim may be made against the publisher. This document has no legal value. Only the official texts of relevant laws and regulations, which are the major sources used in preparing this handbook, have legal value. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

 

1- Australia
This Handbook is intended to provide, in a consolidated and concise form, information regarding the tariff advantages available to developing countries under the scheme of generalized preferences of Australia, and the conditions under which goods may qualify for preferential treatment on importation into Australia.

The Handbook has been prepared by the UNCTAD Technical Cooperation Project on Market Access, Trade Laws and Preferences (INT/97/A06) primarily for use within the context of project activities.

It should be noted that products are described in terms of the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System upon which the Australian Customs Tariff Acts are based. However, matters involving technical interpretation of the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) will be determined in accordance with the provisions of the relevant Australian Customs Tariff Act.

Although based on official texts, the Handbook cannot be regarded as a substitute for these texts. For more detailed information, authentic and up-to-date legal texts should be consulted.

In 1966, Australia became the first country to introduce tariff preferences for developing countries. The scheme consisted of a non-reciprocal preferential arrangement under which specified manufactured and semi-manufactured goods could be imported from developing countries free of duty or at reduced rates of duty.

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of AUSTRALIA 2000 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.56) 01/06/00, 16 Pages, 42 Kb

 

2- Canada
Canada´s General Preferential Tariff (GPT) - Canada´s designation for the GSP scheme - came into effect on 1 July 1974 and was most recently extended until 2004. The rates and product coverage were reviewed in 1995, resulting in expanded product coverage and lower GPT duty-rates. On 1 September 2000, Canada added an extra 570 tariff lines to the list of duty-free tariff items for the benefit of the least developed countries (LDCs).

On 1 January 2003, the Government of Canada extended duty-free and quota-free access to imports from 48 LDCs, including textile and agricultural processed products. From this date, eligible products from beneficiary countries are subject to duty-free and quota-free treatment. New requirements for Rules of Origin applying to LDCs were also introduced.

The Handbook covers (1) product coverage; (2) depth of tariff cuts; (3) safeguard measures; (4) rules of origin; (5) handicraft products; (6) special treatment for LDCs; and (7) other tariff treatments. It also contains a list of products and beneficiary countries.

The following are useful sites:

While every care has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this handbook is correct, no liability or claim may be made against the publisher. This document has no legal value. Only the Regulations published by the Government of Canada, which were the major sources used in preparing this handbook, have legal value. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this handbook do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of CANADA 2002 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.66) 01/12/02, 96 Pages, 370 Kb

 

3- European Union
The European Union´s GSP scheme extends from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2004 for designated countries and territories. It covers numerous agricultural products as well as most processed and semi-processed industrial products. The current scheme simplifies the previous one by replacing the four categories of very sensitive, sensitive, semi-sensitive and non-sensitive products with just two categories: sensitive and non-sensitive products. The Handbook covers the "Everything but Arms" (EBA) amendment, granting unrestricted duty-free access to all products, excluding arms, originating in least developed countries.

The Handbook covers (1) beneficiary eligibility; (2) product coverage; (3) depth of tariff cuts; (4) maintenance of previous margins; (5) country-sector graduation and country graduation; (6) EBA; (7) special agreements to combat drugs; (8) special incentive arrangements; (9) temporary withdrawal of the GSP schemes; (10) suspension of the GSP scheme; (11) the anti-dumping clause; (12) safeguards; and (13) rules of origin. It also contains Council Regulations related to the scheme.

The following is a useful site:

While every care has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this handbook is correct, no liability or claim may be made against the publisher. This document has no legal value. Only the Regulations published in the Official Journal of the European Communities, which were the major sources used in preparing this handbook, have legal value. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this handbook do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of the EUROPEAN COMMUNITY 2003 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.25/Rev.2) 27/06/03, 306 Pages, 1798 Kb

 

4- Japan
Japan´s GSP scheme has been effective since 1 August 1971 and has been extended to 31 March 2011. The scheme grants preferential treatment to 164 developing countries and territories. It covers selected agricultural and fishery products as well as all industrialized products, with some exceptions.

The Handbook covers (1) beneficiary eligibility; (2) product coverage; (3) tariff reduction; (4) ceilings; (5) safeguard mechanisms; (6) the graduation program; (7) special treatment for least developed countries (LDCs); and (8) rules of origin. It also contains a list of products covered by Japan´s GSP scheme. On 1 April 2000 a new list of products (enjoying duty-quota-free treatment) was added for the exclusive benefit of LDC beneficiaries. In April 2003 these lists are expected to cover additional products for LDC beneficiaries.

While every care has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this handbook is correct, no liability or claim may be made against the publisher. This document has no legal value. Only the Regulations published by the Government of Japan, which were the major sources used in preparing this handbook, have legal value. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this handbook do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of JAPAN 2006 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.42/Rev.3) 01/08/06, 109 Pages, 385 Kb

 

5- New Zealand
This Handbook is intended to give, in a consolidated and concise form, information regarding the tariff advantages available to developing countries under the scheme of generalized preferences of New Zealand, and the conditions under which goods may qualify for preferential treatment on importation into New Zealand, on the basis of official texts of the New Zealand Customs administration as of 20 April 1999.

The Handbook has been prepared by the UNCTAD Technical Cooperation Project on Market Access, Trade Laws and Preferences (INT/97/AO6) primarily for use within the context of project activities.

It should be noted the description of products is given in terms of the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System on which the New Zealand Customs Tariff is based. Matters involving technical interpretation of the GSP will be determined, however, in accordance with the provisions of the New Zealand Customs Tariff, since the scheme has been devised on an individual tariff line basis.

Although based of official texts, the Handbook cannot be regarded as a substitute for these texts. For more detailed information, authentic and up-to-date legal texts should be consulted.

 

Further information may be obtained by writing to:

New Zealand Customs Administration
Private Bag
Wellington
New Zealand

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of NEW ZEALAND 1999 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.48) 01/04/99, 27 Pages, 637 Kb

 

6- Norway

For the GSP scheme of Norway, please see website of Tollvesenet (http://www.toll.no/templates_TAD/Article.aspx?id=72220#1), the website of the Norwegian Customs authority.

 

. Download GSP handbook

 

7- Switzerland
The Swiss scheme within the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) was introduced on March 1st, 1972, in compliance with Switzerland´s intention to implement Resolution 21 (II) adopted by UNCTAD II in 1968. It is characterized by the granting of preferential treatment in the form of exemption from duty in most cases and by the wide range of products covered (all industrial products and many of the agricultural goods).

Following the conclusion of the Uruguay Round of GATT, Switzerland undertook a thorough revision of its scheme which had come into force on 1 March 1997. In particular, the preferences for the least developed countries have been extended and the product coverage now includes a large number of agricultural products. In addition, the countries that can benefit under the Swiss scheme have been reconsidered. The system´s basic characteristics of simplicity and consistency remain.

The aim of this publication is to provide information on the Swiss GSP to exporters in beneficiary countries in order to assist them in making full use of the benefits available under the Scheme. The information, though not legally binding, reflects legislation as of 1 March 19971 and of 1 October 19982.

 

1 Date of the entry into force of modification of the Swiss GSP ruling (Arrêté Fédéral concernant l´octroi de préférences tarifaires en faveur des pays en développement).

2 Date of the entry into force of modification of the Swiss GSP scheme on rules of origin (Ordonnance relative aux règles d´origine régissant l´octroi de préférences tarifaires aux pays en développement).

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of SWITZERLAND 1999 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.28/Rev.1) 01/10/99, 115 Pages, 2144 Kb

 

8- Turkey
The Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) aims at contributing to the economic development of developing countries. GSP provides benefits to developing countries by enabling qualified products to enter the markets of preference-giving countries at changing rates from duty free to reductions in the MFN rate.

Turkey applied for association with the European Economic Community in 1959, one year after the enforcement of the Treaty of Rome. The Ankara Agreement of 1963 and the Additional Protocol of 1970 are two important documents which identify modalities and calendars ensuring the future customs union and confirm the ultimate aim of full membership.

The customs union covering industrial products and processed agricultural products which came into force on 1 January 1996 with Decision No 1/95 of The Turkey - EC Association Council was an outcome of these calendars.

Article 16 of Decision No 1/95 of the Association Council states that “With a view to harmonizing its commercial policy with that of the EC, Turkey shall align itself progressively with the preferential customs regime of the EC within five years as from the date of entry into force of this decision. This alignment will concern both autonomous regimes and preferential agreements with third countries.”

Within this context, Turkey initiated a Generalized System of Preferences by harmonizing with the EC’s GSP on 1 January 2002 and extended the system with the view of aiming to align itself fully with the EC’s GSP scheme in the consecutive years. With the 2006 import regime put into force at the beginning of the year, full aligment with the EC’s GSP scheme has been achieved.

 

. Download GSP handbook:

-          GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of Turkey (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.74) 01/12/07, 284 Pages, 2574 Kb

-          GSP - SCHEME OF TURKEY (TD/B/GSP/TURKEY/1) 28/01/03, 11 Pages, 915 Kb

 

9- United States of America

The US GSP scheme permits duty-free entry to all products covered by the scheme. The Trade Act of 2002 officially reauthorized the GSP scheme through December 2006. This Act modifies certain regulations on textile and apparel provision under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). AGOA provides designated sub-Saharan African countries with duty-free and quota-free access for a wider range of products, including sensitive products.

The US GSP Handbook mainly covers (1) benefits and eligibility; (2) the competitive need limitations; (3) how countries can benefit most from the GSP; and (4) the African Growth and Opportunity Act. The Handbook also contains the US legislation related to the US GSP scheme.

The following are useful sites:

While every care has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this handbook is correct, no liability or claim may be made against the publisher. This document has no legal value. Only the Authorizing Legislation of the GSP in the US Code, which was the major source used in preparing this handbook, has legal value. The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this handbook do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

 

. Download GSP handbook: GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 2003, Including features of the African Growth and Opportunities Act (AGOA) Programme (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.58/Rev.1) 10/08/03, 94 Pages, 302 Kb

 

V- RULES OF ORIGIN

Rules of origin are essential component of all GSP schemes. In order to qualify for preferential tariff treatment under GSP scheme, products exported from a GSP preference-receiving country need to fulfil the rules of origin of the respective preference-giving countries.

 

1- GSP certificate of origin: Form A
The claim for GSP treatment must be supported with the appropriate documentary evidence. The GSP Certificate of Origin Form A is used for this purpose.
The Form A was adopted in 1970 by the UNCTAD´s Working Group on Rules of Origin as a common certificate of origin for the purposes of the GSP (TD/B/AC.5/38).
Most recently, changes to the Form A were made:

The Trade and Development Board, at its forty-first session of the Trade and Development Board, held from 18 to 20 April 2007, agreed that the old Form A with notes dated 1996, 2004 and 2005 will remain valid until existing stocks are exhausted.

. Downloads documents:

a)      GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account the European Union’s enlargement and to include the Principality of Liechtenstein (TD/B/GSP/FORM/3) 26/07/07, 3 Pages, 49 Kb

b)      GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account Turkish GSP regime. (TD/B/GSP/FORM/2/Rev.1) 01/11/05, 3 Pages, 51 Kb

c)       GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account the enlargement of the European Union. (TD/B/GSP/FORM/1)
07/12/04, 4 Pages, 30 Kb

 

2- Sample of GSP certificate of origin Form A

. Download document: GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES - CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN (Combined declaration and certificate) FORM A01/11/07, 2 Pages, 33 Kb

3- Format for GSP certificate of origin Form A
-
The certificate should be made in English or French

- The use of English or French for the notes on the reverse of the certificate is not obligatory.

- Each certificate should measure 210 x 297 mm.

The paper used should be white writing paper, sized, not containing mechanical pulp and weighing not less than 25 grams per square meter.
It should have a printed green guilloche-pattern background making any falsification by mechanical or chemical means apparent to the eye.
If the certificates have several copies, only the top copy, which is the original, should be printed with a green guilloche-pattern background.

 

4- Certifying authorities for the GSP certificate of origin, Form A
The beneficiary countries should inform the preference-giving countries, either directly or through the UNCTAD secretariat, the names and addresses of the governmental authorities issuing the GSP Certificate of Origin Form A together with specimens of stamps used by these authorities.
However, it is not required to notify the specimen of signatures or the names of persons authorized to issue Form A.

5- Notifications
. Downloads documents:
a)
GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication received from Djibouti (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/173) 25/07/07, 2 Pages, 29 Kb
b) GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication from the Government of Turkey (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/170) 21/11/06, 18 Pages, 131 Kb
c) GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication from the European Commission: (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/172) 15/11/06, 1 Pages, 33 Kb
d) GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication from the European Commission (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/171) 15/11/06, 1 Pages, 19 Kb

VI- Documents and publications on GSP & Market Access
. Downloads documents:
1- GSP - LIST OF BENEFICIARIES, 01/02/08 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.62/Rev.3), 16 pages, 122KB
2- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of Turkey, 01/12/07 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.74), 284 pages, 2574KB
3- GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account the European Union’s enlargement and to include the Principality of Liechtenstein, 26/07/07 (TD/B/GSP/FORM/3), 3 pages, 49KB
4- GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication received from Djibouti, 25/07/07 (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/173), 2 pages, 29KB
5- GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication from the Government of Turkey, 21/11/06 (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/170), 18 pages, 131KB
6- GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication from the European Commission:, 15/11/06 (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/172), 1 pages, 33KB
7- GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES: Rules of origin - communication from the European Commission, 15/11/06 (TD/B/C.5/ORIGIN/171), 1 pages, 19KB
8- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of JAPAN 2006, 01/08/06 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.42/Rev.3), 109 pages, 385KB
9- GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account Turkish GSP regime., 01/11/05 (TD/B/GSP/FORM/2/Rev.1), 3 pages, 51KB
10- GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account Turkish GSP regime., Note by the UNCTAD secretariat, 27/09/05 (TD/B/GSP/FORM/2), 3 pages, 456KB
11- GSP - RULES OF ORIGIN: Changes to the notes on GSP Form A to take into account the enlargement of the European Union., 07/12/04 (TD/B/GSP/FORM/1), 4 pages, 30KB
12- TRADE PREFERENCES FOR LDCs: AN EARLY ASSESSMENT OF BENEFITS AND POSSIBLE IMPROVEMENTS, 30/01/04 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/2003/8), 129 pages, 4534KB
13- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 2003, Including features of the African Growth and Opportunities Act (AGOA) Programme, 10/08/03 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.58/Rev.1), 94 pages, 302KB
14- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of the EUROPEAN COMMUNITY 2003, 27/06/03 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.25/Rev.2), 306 pages, 1798KB
15- THE AFRICAN GROWTH AND OPPORTUNITY ACT: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT, 23/05/03 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/2003/1), 77 pages, 469KB  
16- GSP - SCHEME OF TURKEY, 28/01/03 (TD/B/GSP/TURKEY/1), 11 pages, 915KB
17- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of CANADA 2002, 01/12/02 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.66), 96 pages, 370KB
18- NEGOTIATING ANTI-DUMPING AND SETTING PRIORITIES AMONG OUTSTANDING IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES IN THE POST DOHA SCENARIO, A First Examination in Light of Recent Practice and DSU Jurisprudence, 01/05/02 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.72), 66 pages, 259KB
19- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of the CZECH REPUBLIC 2001, 01/12/01 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.63), 64 pages, 130KB
20- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of HUNGARY 2001, 01/08/01 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.64), 9 pages, 24KB
21- IMPROVING MARKET ACCESS FOR LDCS, 02/05/01 (UNCTAD/DITC/TNCD/4), 263 pages, 1140KB
22- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of AUSTRALIA 2000, 01/06/00 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.56), 16 pages, 42KB
23- GSP - SCHEME OF NORWAY, Amendment, 14/02/00 (TD/B/GSP/NORWAY/36), 13 pages, 45KB
24- QUANTIFYING THE BENEFITS OBTAINED BY DEVELOPING COUNTRIES FROM THE GENERALIZED SYSTEM OF PREFERENCES, 07/10/99 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.52), 37 pages, 88KB
25- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of SWITZERLAND 1999, 01/10/99 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.28/Rev.1), 115 pages, 2144KB
26- DIGEST OF GSP RULES OF ORIGIN, 01/05/99 (UNCTAD/TAP/133/Rev.7), 21 pages, 820KB
27- GSP - HANDBOOK ON THE SCHEME OF THE REPUBLIC OF POLAND 1999, 01/04/99 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.51), 12 pages, 259KB
28- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of NEW ZEALAND 1999, 01/04/99 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.48), 27 pages, 637KB
29- INFORMAL REPORT BY THE UNCTAD SECRETARIAT ON THE AD HOC MEETING OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL OF UNCTAD ON GSP, GSTP AND NEW INITIATIVES FOR LDCs, Held at the Palais des Nations, Geneva, from 16 to 17 July 1998, 01/09/98 (UNCTAD/SG/AC.1/1), 22 pages, 51KB
30- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of NORWAY 1999, 24/04/98 (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.29), 24 pages, 53KB
31- GSP - Handbook on the Scheme of NEW ZEALAND 1998, 01/04/98 (UNCTAD/TAP/258/Rev.3), 15 pages, 46KB

VII- Selected studies on GSP
. Downloads documents:
1- TRADE PREFERENCES FOR LDCs: AN EARLY ASSESSMENT OF BENEFITS AND POSSIBLE IMPROVEMENTS (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/2003/8) 30/01/04, 129 Pages, 4534 Kb
2- THE AFRICAN GROWTH AND OPPORTUNITY ACT: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/2003/1) Sales no.: E.03.II.D.15 23/05/03, 77 Pages, 469 Kb
3- NEGOTIATING ANTI-DUMPING AND SETTING PRIORITIES AMONG OUTSTANDING IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES IN THE POST DOHA SCENARIO, A First Examination in Light of Recent Practice and DSU Jurisprudence (UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/Misc.72) 01/05/02, 66 Pages, 259 Kb
4- IMPROVING MARKET ACCESS FOR LDCS (UNCTAD/DITC/TNCD/4) 02/05/01, 263 Pages, 1140

VIII- Contact Details for the Generalized System of Preferences
UNCTAD Technical Cooperation on Market Access,
Trade Laws and Preferences
Palais des Nations,
1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

Tel: +41 22 907 4944
Fax: +41 22 907 0044
Email: gsp@unctad.org
Website: http://www.unctad.org